Sunday November 18, 2018

Stress Buster: A simple massage that saves you from disadvantages of Urban Lifestyle

3
//
depression
Depression has significantly increased the risk of early death in women. Wikimedia
Republish
Reprint
  • People living in urban areas have higher levels of psychotic illnesses such as Schizophrenia and Alzheimer
  • Many reports have proved that the greenery and lesser crowd of villages reduces stress
  • Stimulating a point between eyebrows by simply massaging it improves circulation, reduces muscle tension, and stimulates brain chemicals

More than half of the world’s population lives in urban areas. But researchers say that people living in urban areas have to cope with more stress and have higher levels of mood disorders and psychotic illnesses such as Schizophrenia and Alzheimer. The reason might be the busy and hectic lifestyle in cities.

People who live in the country are happier, according to the Daily Mail. Many reports have proved that the greenery and lesser crowd of villages reduces stress but with several cases of farmers committing suicide reported in newspapers  we can easily assume the stress they go through in case of failure in loan repayment or dowry system or many other possible reasons.

Follow NewsGram at Twitter: @newsgram1
Headache Image Source: Wikimedia Commons
Headache Image (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

The reason of stress in city people may be the social aspects of urban living — the stress of living and dealing with lots of people, and feeling more anxiety, fear and threat as a result.  The other urban factors like pollution or noise makes the condition worse.  Although, the city dwellers would never face the same stress that people in rural areas do.

Here is an exercise which can be performed by only using your own two hands and it can evaporate all your tiredness, stress and anxiety in less than 5 minutes.

By simply massaging a point between your eyebrows on the forehead can help you release stress as soon as possible

What you need to do is – find the ledge between your eyebrows on the forehead.

Then, massage this point for 45 seconds.

Follow NewsGram on Facebook: NewsGram

Stimulating this point by simply pressing and massaging it improves circulation, reduces muscle tension, and stimulates brain chemicals known as endorphins.  Apart from just relieving stress, calming your mind, reducing headaches, chronic fatigue, insomnia, and eye pressure, this massage is very effective at alleviating pain in the sinuses and clearing nasal congestion. This massage will help you relieve headaches, stress, and other causes of interrupted sleep.

-The article is compiled by a staff-writer at NewsGram.

ALSO READ:

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2016 NewsGram

  • Aparna Gupta

    It’s better to try out this exercise rather than taking any allopathic medicines as latter can cause side effects.

  • Vrushali Mahajan

    Stress busters should be a good way. People living in urban ares should often visit places which are calmer, greener, less crowdy and should often meditate. This rejuvenates the body and the brain

  • devika todi

    I read somewhere that people belonging to the age group of 18-33 are the most stressed. i guess if we make this simple exercise a part of our lifestyle, we will be more relaxed and will benefit from the other positive aspects of the exercise as well, like decreasing insomnia and headaches!

SHARE
  • Aparna Gupta

    It’s better to try out this exercise rather than taking any allopathic medicines as latter can cause side effects.

  • Vrushali Mahajan

    Stress busters should be a good way. People living in urban ares should often visit places which are calmer, greener, less crowdy and should often meditate. This rejuvenates the body and the brain

  • devika todi

    I read somewhere that people belonging to the age group of 18-33 are the most stressed. i guess if we make this simple exercise a part of our lifestyle, we will be more relaxed and will benefit from the other positive aspects of the exercise as well, like decreasing insomnia and headaches!

Next Story

Loneliness And Depression Can Be Linked to Social Media: Study

It is unclear if the depressing effects of social media will cross generational lines to older or younger people

0
Social Media,
This photo taken March 22, 2018, shows apps for WhatsApp, Facebook, Instagram and other social networks on a smartphone. VOA

University of Pennsylvania researchers say that for the first time they have linked social media use to increases in depression and loneliness.

The idea that social media is anything but social when it comes to mental health has been talked about for years, but not many studies have managed to actually link the two.

To do that, Penn researchers, led by psychologist Melissa Hunt, designed a study that focused on Facebook, Snapchat and Instagram.

The results were published in the November issue of the Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology.

Social media. Offensive Speech
An iPhone with Twitter, Facebook and other apps, May 21, 2013. U.S. internet companies are taking a harder look at their policies that have promoted free expression around the world.. VOA

How study worked

The study was conducted with 143 participants, who before they began, completed a mood survey and sent along photos of their battery screens, showing how often they were using their phones to access social media.

“We set out to do a much more comprehensive, rigorous study that was also more ecologically valid,” Hunt said. That term, ecologically valid, means that the research attempts to mimic real life.

The study divided the participants into two groups: The first group was allowed to maintain their normal social media habits. The other, the control group, was restricted to 10 minutes per day on each of the three platforms: Facebook, Snapchat and Instagram.

The restrictions were put in place for three weeks and then the participants returned and were tested for outcomes such as fear of missing out (FOMO), anxiety, depression and loneliness.

Social Media
Chiara Valenzano, right, photographs her food as she has lunch with her friend Giulia Terranova at the ‘This is not a Sushi bar’ restaurant, in Milan, Italy, Oct. 16, 2018. At the restaurant, payment can be made according to the number of Instagram followers one has. VOA

Results of study

The results showed a very clear link between social media use and increased levels of depression and loneliness.

“Using less social media than you normally would leads to significant decreases in both depression and loneliness,” Hunt said. “These effects are particularly pronounced for folks who were more depressed when they came into the study.”

She calls her findings the “grand irony” of social media.

What is it about social media that’s just so depressing?

Hunt says that it’s two major things. The first is that social media invites what Hunt calls “downward social comparison.” When you’re online, it can sometimes seem that “everyone else is cooler and having more fun and included in more things and you’re left out,” she said. And that’s just generally demoralizing.

Social Media
The study was conducted with 143 participants, who before they began, completed a mood survey Pixabay

The second factor is a bit more nuanced.

“Time is a zero-sum game,” Hunt told VOA. “Every minute you spend online is a minute you are not doing your work or not meeting a friend for dinner or having a deep conversation with your roommate.”

And these real life activities are the ones that can bolster self-esteem and self worth, Hunt said.

What to learn

So what’s the takeaway?

social media
A girl uses her mobile phone in Jakarta, Indonesia, July 5, 2017. A researcher in Britain says her findings suggest young girls who are more active on social media have lower levels of well-being in their teens. VOA

People are on their devices, and that’s not going to change, she said. But as in life, a bit of moderation goes a long way.

“In general, I would say, put your phone down and be with the people in your life,” she added.

Also Read: Childhood Violence May Spur Puberty, Depression: Study

Hunt pointed out a few caveats to the study. First, it was done exclusively with 18- to 22-year-olds, and it is unclear if the depressing effects of social media will cross generational lines to older or younger people, Hunt said. But she expects her results should generalize at least for people through the age of 30.

Hunt says she is now beginning a study to gauge the emotional impact of dating apps. (VOA)