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Unlocking The Cage: A film about man’s quest to achieve legal rights for animals

“Unlocking The Cage” is all about one man’s quest to achieve legal rights for animals

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Chimpanzee. Image source: interrete.org

Filmmakers D.A. Pennebaker and Chris Hegedus have come up with a new documentary called “Unlocking The Cage”. These 2 have collaborated on major award-winning films such as “The War Room, about Bill Clinton’s Presidential Campaign. In their new release, they have bought up their acute observational style of filmmaking.

According to npr.org, “Unlocking The Cage” is all about one man’s quest to achieve legal rights for animals. The whole plot is told from the Steven’s point of view (Steven Wise is a leading animal rights lawyer). In this film, he struggles in a New York Court to recognize a chimpanzee named Tommy as a person with limited legal rights. Above all the film is a sympathetic portrait of an advocate.

Poster of the film, "Unlocking the Cage". Image source: unlockingthecagethefilm.com
Poster of the film, “Unlocking the Cage”. Image source: unlockingthecagethefilm.com

Mr. Wise ideology is that “Animals should have the legal status of persons. What this means is not that they should be classified as human, but rather that their rights should be acknowledged and protected under the law.

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In the film, he is portrayed as a rumpled man in his mid-60s who defends in front of skeptical judges and journalists. His clients are the chimpanzees living in New York State in what appear to be miserable conditions. The camera follows Mr. Wise and his colleagues for several years as they build a case that they hope will establish a new precedent.

In the end, Mr. Wise also remarks in the movie that “This is the end of the beginning.” Some of Mr. Wise’s Positions also seems to be questionable. For example: How can a being without human language or human culture have to stand to seek redress from human institutions?

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Hegedus believes that a cultural shift is taking place right now in the world. So he hopes that his film will last. The filmmakers believe that once it is out in the world its fate is out of their hands.

-by Pritam, an intern at Newsgram. Twitter: Pritam_Gogreen

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  • Vrushali Mahajan

    Films like these should be appreciated to its best. We really need such kind of movies so that we understand the habits of animals and their rights

  • devika todi

    it should be ensured that such movies receive maximum appreciation and attention.

  • Paras Vashisth

    I really appreciate this because this types of films and documentaries create an impact on people’s minds which is very helpful to understand something.

SHARE
  • Vrushali Mahajan

    Films like these should be appreciated to its best. We really need such kind of movies so that we understand the habits of animals and their rights

  • devika todi

    it should be ensured that such movies receive maximum appreciation and attention.

  • Paras Vashisth

    I really appreciate this because this types of films and documentaries create an impact on people’s minds which is very helpful to understand something.

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Nature Therapy Can Reduce Distress, Behavioural Problems in Kids

The results give a new possibility for investigating the link between the outdoor environment and well-being in pre-school children

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Extreme distress increases risk for dementia: Study. Pixabay

Does your child often feel stressed and depressed? A walk in the woods is likely to improve his/her mood, researchers said.

The study, led by a team from the University of Hong Kong, revealed that children who developed a closer connection with nature had less distress, less hyperactivity and had a healthy lifestyle with regard to active play and eating habits.

They also had fewer behavioural and emotional difficulties, as well as improved pro-social behaviour.

However, despite the extensive, adjacent greenness, many families are not using these areas, the researchers rued in the paper published in the PLOS ONE journal.

“We noticed a tendency where parents are avoiding nature. They perceive it as dirty and dangerous, and their children unfortunately pick up these attitudes,” said Tanja Sobko from the University’s School of Biological Sciences.

Kids play skip rope on Morro Strand State Beach. Flickr

In addition, the green areas are often unwelcoming with signs like “Keep off the grass”, Sobko added.

Recent research shows that spending time with nature may bring many health benefits, and many environmental programmes around the world are trying to decrease ‘nature-deficit’ and ‘child-nature disconnectedness’ in order to improve children’s health.

For the study, the team prepared a new 16-item parent questionnaire (CNI-PPC) to measure “connectedness to nature’ in very young children. The questionnaire identified four areas that reflect the child-nature relationship: enjoyment of nature, empathy for nature, responsibility towards nature and awareness of nature.

Also Read- Soothing Colours, Right Scent Aid Sound Sleep

The results give a new possibility for investigating the link between the outdoor environment and well-being in pre-school children.

The team further plans to test the effect of exposing children to nature and changes in their gut microbiota. (IANS)